Greek-Style Nachos

Greek-Style Nachos

Greek Nachos
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Greek Nachos

Greek-Style Nachos


  • Author: Amy RD, LDN
  • Total Time: 1 hr 50 mins
  • Yield: 6 servings 1x
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

Delicious Greek-Style Nachos with Chickpeas, Feta, Tomato & Olives


Ingredients

Scale

Chickpeas

  • 1 lb Dried Chickpeas (See notes for alternative options)
  • 1 tbsp Olive OIl
  • 1 Onion (medium)
  • 4 Garlic cloves
  • 2 tsp Paprika
  • 2 tsp Ground Cumin
  • 1/4 tsp Garam Masala (Optional)
  • 1/4 tsp Cayenne Pepper
  • 1/2 tsp Lemon Zest
  • 2 tsp Kosher Salt
  • 4 cups Vegetable Broth

Pita Chips

  • 2 Pita Bread
  • 2 tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1/2 tsp Kosher Salt

Veggie Salad

  • 1 Cucumber, peeled, seeded and chopped
  • 1 pt Cherry Tomatoes, sliced in half

Toppings

  • Greek Yogurt
  • Feta Cheese
  • Kalamata Olives
  • Hot Sauce (Optional)

Instructions

Chickpeas

  1. Sort and rinse your dried chickpeas. (If using canned skip this step.) Fill a large bowl with 6 cups water, pour chickpeas into bowl and soak overnight.
  2. Preheat oven to 375° F. Drain your soaked chickpeas, set aside.
  3. In a large dutch oven or large pot, heat 1 tbsp olive oil over medium heat. Add sliced onion to pan, sautee until slightly browned.
  4. Lower the heat to medium-low and add minced garlic and sautee for 1-2 minutes until fragrant.
  5. Add the spices, salt and lemon zest to garlic and onions and sautee for another 30 seconds.
  6. Add vegetable stock to pot and then the chickpeas (soaked or canned). Using a wooden spoon or spatula, stir mixture together and then bring to a boil. Then, turn the heat off and cover the pot with a lid.
  7. Next, put the dutch oven into your preheated oven and bake for 45 minutes to 1 1/2 hours, depending on the chickpeas you are using. (If you are using canned, it should take around 45 minutes for the chickpeas to soak up the yummy liquid. If you are using dry, soaked chickpeas it will take closer to an hour to an half and half for the beans to soak up the liquid.)
  8. Once the liquid has been absorbed by the chickpeas they are done. Remove from the oven and set aside.

Toppings:

  1. Slice your pita bread into triangles, drizzle 1 tbsp olive oil and 1/8 tsp salt over top and place onto a sheet tray (Skip this step if you bought pre-made pita chips!)
  2. Bake pita chips in the oven with your chickpeas for 8-10 minutes. Keep an eye on them as they burn easily!

 

Vegetable Topping:

  1. Slice 1 pint cherry tomatoes in half lengthwise. Peel, seed and chop cucumber to 1 inch chunks.
  2. Serve with Greek yogurt, feta cheese, kalamata olives and hot sauce as desired.

 

To Plate:

  1. Set pita chips on plate, top with dollops of Greek Yogurt, then the delicious braised chickpeas, cucumber and tomatoes, feta, kalamata olives and hot sauce. Enjoy!!
 

 

Notes

Notes:
  1. You can make this as simple or complicated as you’d like. Using canned chickpeas and store bought pita chips makes this a week-night winner!
  2. To substitute canned chickpeas use 4 cans, 15 oz each
  3. *This recipe was inspired by several Greek Nacho style recipes and including SmittenKitchen’s Braised Chickpeas.
  • Prep Time: 20min
  • Cook Time: 1 hr 30 mins
  • Category: Appetizers, Dinner, Lunch, Mediterranean, Salad, Sides
  • Method: Braise
  • Cuisine: Greek

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 6
  • Calories: 541
  • Fat: 19g
  • Saturated Fat: 5g
  • Carbohydrates: 71g
  • Fiber: 15g
  • Protein: 27g
  • Cholesterol: 24mg

Keywords: Greek, Mediterranean, Chickpeas

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Healthy Brownie Bites with Oat Flour, Cranberries and Chocolate Chips

Healthy Brownie Bites with Oat Flour, Cranberries and Chocolate Chips

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Healthy Brownie Bites with Oat Flour, Cranberries and Chocolate Chips


  • Author: Amy RD, LDN
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 18 servings 1x

Description

Chocolaty, tasty and naturally sweetened, these brownie bites are fiber-filled treats!


Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 Cup Oat Flour or Old Fashioned Oats
  • 1/2 cup Cocoa Powder
  • 1/4 cup Vanilla Protein Powder
  • 1/2 tsp Kosher Salt
  • 1 tsp Baking Powder
  • 2 tbsp Ground Flax Seed
  • 1/4 cup Honey
  • 1/4 cup Maple Syrup
  • 1/2 cup Almond Butter
  • 1 Egg
  • 1/2 cup Dried Cranberries
  • 1/2 cup Chocolate Chips

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 350° F
  2. Set a nonstick sheet tray out for baking. Or line a sheet tray with parchment paper or silpat. Set aside.
  3. In the bowl of a food processor, pulse 1 cup old fashioned oats until finely ground. Alternatively, if you purchased oat flour, skip this step.
  4. In a large mixing bowl add the oat flour, cocoa powder, protein powder, salt, baking powder and flax seed. Whisk to combine the dry ingredients.
  5. To the dry ingredients add the honey, maple syrup and almond butter. Using a spatula stir the batter together. It will be quite thick!
  6. *Tip, spray your measuring cup with nonstick spray before you measure the honey and it will slide out easily!
  7. Add the dried cranberries and chocolate chips to the batter. Stir to combine.
  8. Using a 1 1/2″ scoop, spoon batter onto sheet tray, leaving about 1″ between each brownie bite. The cookies will not spread very much. Continue until all the batter as been scooped onto your baking trays.
  9. Bake at 350° F for 8-9 minutes. Be sure not to overcook, you want them slightly soft and gooey.
  10. Let the brownie bites cool slightly and enjoy!
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Category: Dessert, Snack
  • Method: Baking

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 167
  • Sugar: 14g
  • Sodium: 90mg
  • Fat: 7g
  • Saturated Fat: 2g
  • Trans Fat: 0g
  • Carbohydrates: 23g
  • Fiber: 3g
  • Protein: 5g
  • Cholesterol: 12mg

Keywords: Dessert, Oat Flour, Brownie Bites

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Maple & Olive Oil Granola

Maple & Olive Oil Granola

Maple Olive Oil Granola
Maple Olive Oil Granola
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Maple Olive Oil Granola

Maple & Olive Oil Granola


  • Author: Amy RD, LDN
  • Yield: 10 Servings 1x
  • Diet: Gluten Free

Description

Maple & Olive Oil Granola is an antioxidant fueled breakfast that goes great over Greek Yogurt or eaten plain as a snack.


Ingredients

Scale
  • 1/2 cup Olive Oil
  • 1/2 cup Maple Syrup
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • 3 3/4 cups Old Fashioned Oats (Use 3 3/4 cups for more granola clusters, use 4 cups for “crumbly” granola)
  • 1/4 cup Flaxseed
  • 1 tsp Ground Cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp Cardamom (Optional)
  • 1 1/2 cups Raw Nuts (I used Pecans and Sliced Almonds)
  • 1/4 tsp Kosher Salt
  • 1/4 cup Dried Cranberries (Or your favorite dried fruit)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 325° F.
  2. To a large mixing bowl add the oats, nuts, cinnamon, cardamom (if using), and salt. Stir together with a spatula and set aside.
  3. In a liquid measuring cup add the olive oil and maple syrup. Mix together and then add the vanilla extract.
  4. Pour the liquid mixture over the oats mixture and stir together thoroughly with a spatula.
     
  5. Spread the granola mixture evenly onto a large sheet tray and bake for 25 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes.
  6. After 25 minutes remove the granola from the oven and add the dried cranberries. Mix together and then allow the granola to cool before serving.
  7. Tip: If you want your granola to have large clusters (which I do!) after you add the dried cranberries, press the granola down with the back of a spatula, then allow to cool fully.
  8. Serve over Greek Yogurt or enjoy plain as a snack!
 
  • Category: Breakfast, Snack, Gluten-Free, Vegetarian
  • Method: Bake

Nutrition

  • Calories: 353
  • Sugar: 9g
  • Sodium: 61mg
  • Fat: 23g
  • Saturated Fat: 2g
  • Carbohydrates: 33g
  • Fiber: 5g
  • Protein: 7g
  • Cholesterol: 0mg

Keywords: Antioxidant Breakfast, Healthy Breakfast, Easy Granola Recipe

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Black Forest Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese

Black Forest Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese

Black Forest Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese
Black Forest Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese
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Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese

Black Forest Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese


  • Author: Amy RD, LDN
  • Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Yield: 10 Servings 1x

Description

A take on butternut squash macaroni and cheese with farm fresh ingredients from the Black Forest market. Key ingredients from the market include butternut squash, Gouda cheese, cheddar cheese, sourdough breadcrumbs, mushrooms, and garlic along microgreens for garnish.


Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 Butternut Squash
  • 2 Garlic Cloves
  • 2 tsp Kosher Salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp Ground Black Pepper
  • 2 tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 cup Milk or Vegetable Stock
  • 4 oz Aged Gouda Cheese, Shredded
  • 8 oz Sharp Cheddar Cheese, Shredded
  • 8 oz Oyster Mushrooms (Optional)
  • 16 oz Pasta, Cavatappi
Breadcrumb Topping
  • 1 cup Sourdough Bread
  • 1 Garlic Clove
  • 1/4 cup Herbs (Parsley, Basil)
  • 1 tsp Olive Oil

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400° F
  2. Line a large sheet tray with foil, set aside.
  3. Using a sharp knife, slice the butternut squash in half lengthwise. Be careful as the squash’s skin is quite tough! Using a spoon, scoop out the seeds and bit of flesh from the squash.
  4. Spread 1 tablespoon olive oil over the squash halves. Place 1 garlic clove in each squash. Add 1 tsp kosher salt and 1/2 tsp ground black pepper. Place sheet tray into the preheated oven and roast for 40-60 minutes, depending on the size of your butternut squash. You will know the squash is done when you can press it with a fork and it is soft.
     
  5. While the squash is roasting, cook your pasta. Fill a large pot with water and bring to a boil. Add 2 tsp salt to your water. Add your pasta and cook 1 minute under the recommended time. You want your pasta to be “al dente” and have a little bite to it. Drain the pasta and set the pot aside to use again.
  6. Let the squash cool for at least 10 minutes. After 10 minutes scoop the flesh of the butternut squash out and place into the bowl of a food processor. Be sure to scoop all the flesh and the garlic!
  7. Add 1 cup of milk or stock to the food processor. Process the mixture until it is smooth and creamy.
  8. Place the pot you used for the pasta onto the stove and heat to low. Using a spatula spoon the butternut squash mixture into the pot. Add both the shredded Gouda and cheddar cheeses and the mushrooms (if using). Stir the cheeses into the butternut squash mixture until they are melted. At this point check your mixture for seasoning. Add additional salt and pepper to taste.
  9. Add the cooked pasta to your squash and cheese mixture. Mix thoroughly.
  10. Place pasta mixture into a 9×13 dish that has been coated with cooking spray.
  11. In a small bowl, mix together the breadcrumbs, herbs, minced garlic and olive oil. Spread mixture evenly over top of your mac and cheese.
  12. Bake for 25-30 minutes or until bubbly and golden brown on top. Allow to cool for 5 minutes, enjoy!
 
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 75
  • Category: Dinner, Sides, Holiday
  • Method: Bake

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 388
  • Sugar: 2g
  • Sodium: 1155mg
  • Fat: 17g
  • Saturated Fat: 7g
  • Unsaturated Fat: 4g
  • Carbohydrates: 21g
  • Fiber: 4g
  • Protein: 38g
  • Cholesterol: 36mg

Keywords: Mac and Cheese, Butternut Squash, Black Forest Farmer’s Market

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Waffled Veggie Latkes

Waffled Veggie Latkes

Waffled Veggie Latkes
Waffled Veggie Latkes
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Waffled Veggie Latkes


  • Author: Amy RD, LDN
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 6 Servings 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 3 Carrots
  • 2 Zucchini (medium size)
  • 1 Orange or Red Bell Pepper
  • 1/2 Yellow Onion
  • 4 Russet Potatoes (medium size)
  • 1/2 cup Flour
  • 1 tsp Baking Powder
  • 1 tsp Kosher Salt
  • 1/2 tsp Ground Black Pepper
  • 3 Eggs
Toppings
  • Cream Cheese
  • Greek Yogurt
  • Smoked Salmon
  • Scallions
  • Everything Bagel Seasoning

Instructions

  1. Shred those veggies! Spread a clean kitchen towel over your work surface. Using a box grater, grate the carrots, zucchini, potatoes and half onion right onto the towel.
  2. Finely dice the bell pepper and add to the veggies on the towel.
  3. Gather the towel with the shredded vegetables and move to a sink or bowl. Squeeze the towel with the veggies to remove as much liquid as possible.
  4. Place the shredded vegetables into a large mixing bowl. Add the 3 eggs and mix together. Next, add the 1/2 cup flour, baking powder, salt and pepper. Using a large spatula or spoon thoroughly stir the mixture.
  5. Heat a waffle iron to medium heat. Coat waffle iron with olive oil or spray with cooking spray. Place 1/2 cup of the mixture into the waffle iron. Cook for 4-5 minutes until golden brown. Tip: Keep the cooked Latkes in a 300° oven to stay warm and avoid getting soggy while the others cook.
  6. Top waffled veggies with your choice of toppings. Suggestions include, cream cheese, Greek yogurt, smoked salmon, scallions and everything bagel seasoning.

 

  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Category: Dinner, Lunch, Mediterranean

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 192
  • Sugar: 5g
  • Sodium: 452mg
  • Fat: 3g
  • Carbohydrates: 35g
  • Fiber: 4g
  • Protein: 8g
  • Cholesterol: 93mg

Keywords: Waffled Latkes

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No-Cook Pizza Sauce

No-Cook Pizza Sauce

No-Cook Pizza Sauce
No-Cook Pizza Sauce
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No-Cook Pizza Sauce

No-Cook Pizza Sauce


  • Author: Amy RD, LDN
  • Total Time: 5 minutes
  • Yield: 8 Servings 1x
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

Quick and easy, this no-cook pizza sauce is an easy addition to at-home pizza night!


Ingredients

Scale
  • 28 oz Whole Canned Tomatoes (no salt added)
  • 1 Garlic Clove
  • 1 tbsp Balsamic Vinegar (1-2 tablespoons)
  • 1 tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1/2 tsp Kosher Salt
  • 1/4 tsp Black Pepper

Instructions

  1. Using a can opener, open the canned tomatoes and drain off the liquid. Pour the tomatoes into a food processor or blender.
  2. To the food processor add the garlic clove, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, kosher salt and pepper and puree until smooth.
  3. Taste your sauce and adjust seasonings to your preference.
 
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Category: Dinner, Sauce, Lunch
  • Method: Food Processor

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 43
  • Sugar: 3g
  • Sodium: 169mg
  • Fat: 1.6g
  • Carbohydrates: 6g
  • Fiber: 1.8g
  • Protein: 1g
  • Cholesterol: 0mg

Keywords: No Cook Recipe, Pizza Sauce, Easy Pizza Sauce

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Buddha Bowls

Buddha Bowls

Buddha Bowls
Buddha Bowls
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Buddha Bowls

Buddha Bowls


  • Author: Amy RD, LDN
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6 Servings 1x
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

Buddha Bowls are a fun way to use up veggies or up your veggie intake.


Ingredients

Scale
  • 2 cups Cooked Brown Rice
  • 1 Cucumber, peeled, seeded and diced
  • 2 Carrots, shredded
  • 1 cup Edamame (thawed if frozen)
  • 1 Red Bell Pepper, seeded and diced
  • 1 Can Salmon, drained
  • 1 Avocado, sliced
  • 8 oz Water Chestnuts, rinsed and drained
  • 5 tbsp Soy Sauce

Instructions

  1. Cook the rice according to package directions. Meanwhile, prep your vegetables as listed in the ingredients.
  2. Once the rice is cooked, assemble your bowls!
  3. Scoop 1/2 cup brown rice into a bowl, add toppings per your preference. Top dish with soy sauce, hoisin or Sriracha if that’s your thing!

 

  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 15
  • Category: Dinner, Lunch, Low FODMAP

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 400
  • Sugar: 3.7g
  • Sodium: 244mg
  • Fat: 6g
  • Saturated Fat: 1g
  • Carbohydrates: 72g
  • Fiber: 7g
  • Protein: 14g
  • Cholesterol: 10mg

Keywords: Low FODMAP

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Dietitian and Pharmacist Break Down the Newest Weight Loss Drugs

The realm of weight loss is a big business that includes everything from shakes and powders to supplements and bars. Within this mentality of a “quick-fix” for weight loss, weight-loss medications are ever popular. As the holidays are approaching many individuals become concerned with “staying on track” as sweets and treats become more abundant. Now the demand has turned to popular diabetes medications to help individuals quickly lose weight or keep it off through the holidays. Even Elon Musk credited Wegovy (as well as fasting) for his dramatic slim down, and celebrities are using Ozempic for quick weight loss before big events. So, what are these medications and are they an answer for weight loss? Let’s dig in.

What is Ozempic?

Ozempic (semaglutide) is a medication used to reduce A1C levels, in individuals with type 2 diabetes. It also works to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke in these individuals. Semaglutide works by targeting GLP-1 receptors in the pancreas and brain. These receptors control the release of insulin and glucacon in the body. Semaglutide binds to these receptors to increase the amount of insulin released and decrease glucagon levels. This reduces the amount of sugar in the bloodstream. The medication also slows gastric emptying, which leads to a decreased food intake due to a feeling of fullness.

When Ozempic first came on the market, patient weight loss results were so significant the manufacturer started running trials on the drug with the outcome of treating obesity.

Wegovy, which uses the same medication (semaglutide) as Ozempic, was released by Novo Nordisk to treat obesity along with a reduced calorie diet and physical activity.

What is the difference between Wegovy and Ozempic?

The difference between Wegovy and Ozempic is the dosing. Lower doses are appropriate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, while higher doses are typically used for weight loss. However, there have been some instances where Ozempic has been prescribed off label and used for weight loss. Several articles detail celebrities losing weight for events using Ozempic.

Both medications are once weekly injections. The pens must be kept in the fridge until first use. After first use, Ozempic pens can remain at room temperature for 56 days. Wegovy pens are single-use only and should be discarded after use.

Side effects to be aware of with this medication:

  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Constipation
  • Vomiting
  • Acute abdominal pain

New Trials for Weight Loss in Adolescents

New trials are now being conducted to test the appropriateness of this medication to combat obesity in teenagers. Approximately 17% of adolescents in the 10 to 17 age range are considered obese. This comes with serious health complications such as early onset hypertension, type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol, and joint problems. So far in trials, Wegovy has shown to be more effective for weight loss in obese teenagers than lifestyle interventions alone. More information is needed to understand the underlying cause of teenage obesity so targeted lifestyle interventions can be improved.

The Problem With Weight Loss Medications Alone

Many times weight loss medications are viewed as “quick-fix” options for extreme weight loss. The problem with this mentality is that this weight loss is not sustainable. Both Ozempic and Wegovy mention the drugs should be used in combination with “a reduced calorie meal plan and increased physical activity.”

A new study found that long-term 10% weight loss was achieved when the weight loss medication was used in conjunction with lifestyle interventions.

Also, depending on your individual health, wellness and goals, weight loss medications may not be right for you. Another study notes that, “In a head to head trial, lifestyle intervention was superior to pharmacotherapy in preventing type 2 diabetes in patients at high risk for the condition.”

It is also important to mention that one trial showed that weight loss slowed after stopping Wegovy , even with lifestyle intervention.  Further research is needed to determine an appropriate long-term plan for patients requiring Wegovy for weight loss.

Pharmacist Sam’s Tips:

  • Semaglutide should be used appropriately – Ozempic for diabetes, Wegovy for weight loss. This prevents strain on the manufacturer to keep up with high demand and improves accessibility to medication for diabetics.
  • Use these medications while working with a dietitian and pharmacist on lifestyle changes to improve long-term results.
  • Ask your pharmacist about how to properly store, inject, and discard your medication.
  • Know what to do if you miss a dose.
  • Common side effects should reduce over time, typically within the first month.

Amy RD’s Tips:

  • Always discuss medications with your doctor as well as your pharmacist for questions
  • Weight loss medications should be used in conjunction with lifestyle interventions, dietitians are experts in nutrition and lifestyle interventions
  • Find a dietitian that will work with you and your specific needs and goals
  • Remember that small changes can add up to big results, weight loss medications are not always the answer for long-term, sustainable weight-loss

References:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-11236583/Celebrities-spending-1-500-month-diabetes-drug-incredible-weight-loss.html#:~:text=Celebrities%20are%20spending%20%241%2C500%20a%20month%20on%20diabetes,need%20it%20to%20manage%20their%20condition%20More%20items

Weight loss drug Wegovy helped teens with obesity lose weight (nbcnews.com)

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33755728/

Farmer’s Market Panzanella Salad

Farmer’s Market Panzanella Salad

Farmer's Market Panzanella
Farmer’s Market Panzanella
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Farmer's Market Panzanella

Farmer’s Market Panzanella Salad


  • Author: Amy RD, LDN
  • Total Time: 15 minutes
  • Yield: 8 Servings 1x

Description

Fresh, flavorful and full of nutrients this salad is always a crowd-pleaser. Add your favorite vegetables to make it your own!


Ingredients

Scale

Salad

  • 1 pt Cherry Tomatoes, sliced in half lengthwise
  • 1 Red Bell Pepper, diced into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 Yellow or Orange Bell Pepper, diced into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 Large Cucumber, peeled, seeded and diced into 1-inch pieces
  • 1/2 Red Onion, sliced thinly
  • 10 Basil Leaves, torn
  • 1 Ear of Corn, kernels removed
  • 1/2 Loaf of Sourdough Bread
Vinaigrette
  • 1 tsp Minced Garlic
  • 1/2 tsp Dijon Mustard
  • 3 tbsp Red Wine Vinegar
  • 1/2 cup Olive Oil
  • 1/2 tsp Kosher Salt
  • 1/4 tsp Ground Black Pepper
  • 1 tsp Honey

Instructions

Prepare the Vinaigrette
  1. Combine all vinaigrette ingredients into a mason jar or medium mixing bowl and whisk all the ingredients together. Set aside.
     
Salad Directions
  1. Slice bread into 1-inch cubes.
  2. Heat large sauté pan over medium heat. Add 4 tablespoons olive oil to pan. Add bread cubes to pan and cook until golden brown, tossing occasionally. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
  3. In a separate bowl add the tomatoes, bell peppers, red onion, basil, and corn. Add the bread cubes to the mixture.
  4. Stir in half of the vinaigrette and mix together. Taste the salad and add more vinaigrette as needed. Enjoy!
 

Notes

*Make this salad your own! Use your favorite vegetables, add feta, fresh mozzarella, whatever you like!

  • Prep Time: 15
  • Category: Mediterranean, Dinner, Salad, Appetizer, Side, Black Forest Farmer’s Market

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 230
  • Sugar: 4g
  • Sodium: 480mg
  • Fat: 14g
  • Carbohydrates: 23g
  • Fiber: 1g
  • Protein: 4g
  • Cholesterol: 0mg

Keywords: Panzanella Salad, Tomato Salad, Black Forest Farmer’s Market

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Fall Apple & Pear Compote

Fall Apple & Pear Compote

Apple and Pear Compote
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Apple and Pear Compote

Fall Apple & Pear Compote


  • Author: Amy RD, LDN
  • Total Time: 30

Description

This fall compote is an easy appetizer, snack or even breakfast! Mix it up with your favorite apples or pears and serve on crostini or whole wheat waffles for a fall twist to your morning meal.


Ingredients

Scale
  • 3 Honey Crisp Apples
  • 2 Bartlett Pears
  • 2 tbsp Butter
  • 1 tbsp Honey
  • 1/2 tsp Cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp Lemon juice
  • Pinch of Salt

Instructions

  1. Peel and core the Apples and Pears.
  2. Cut fruit into 1/2-inch pieces. Set aside.
  3. Heat a small saucepan over medium heat. Add butter and melt.
  4. To the saucepan add apples, pears, cinnamon, honey, lemon juice and a pinch of salt.
  5. Bring the mixture to a boil. Once the mixture has been brought to boil, reduce heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the apples and pears are soft and tender.
  6. Serve over pancakes, a toasted baguette with goat cheese, or ice cream.
 
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Category: Appetizer, Snack, Black Forest Farmer’s Market, Breakfast, Dessert

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1/4 cup
  • Calories: 94
  • Sugar: 13g
  • Sodium: 19mg
  • Fat: 3g
  • Saturated Fat: 2g
  • Carbohydrates: 18g
  • Fiber: 3g
  • Protein: 1g
  • Cholesterol: 8mg

Keywords: Apple, Pear, Compote

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All Tricks and No Treats: Helping Parents Navigate Halloween with Food Allergy Concerns

Halloween is a fun time for kids and parents, dressing up, trick-or-treating and the thrill of being out after dark. Halloween excitement can quickly turn to stress and anxiety for parents of children with food allergies. In the United States one in 13 children has a food allergy and we have some tips for parents on how to help reduce some anxiety related to this candy-filled holiday.

Top 8 Food Allergens:

  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Peanuts
  • Tree Nuts
  • Soy
  • Shellfish
  • Fish
  • Wheat

Thrive Nutrition RDN’s Tips for Parents:

Talk About It: Talk with your child about their food allergy. Depending on their age this can be a simple or in-depth explanation. For young children, explain that certain foods can make them sick. You can do this by using terms you feel comfortable with. Some parents use simple “yes” and “no” foods, other ideas are “safe” and “unsafe” foods, or “green light foods” and “red light foods.” Whatever you choose, stick with the those terms while your child is young in order keep the message clear. Reassure your child that “yes/safe/green light” foods are okay for them to eat. Finally, make sure your child knows what to do if they think they’ve eaten a food they are allergic to, such as tell an adult, especially if they do not feel well.

Check the labels: Always read the ingredients labels and look for ingredients that relate to your child’s allergy. Many times candy is processed in a facility that also processes peanuts or tree nuts so be sure to look for that notation on a label. Also, any candy that does not have a nutrition label should be avoided.

Find a Teal Pumpkin: The Teal Pumpkin Project promotes safe trick-or-treating for children with food allergies. A teal pumpkin on a doorstep signals that non-food treats are inside.

Work Together on Rules: Set boundaries with your child before trick-or-treating. Do they need to wait until they get home before sampling any candy? If so talk about it together. If you know they will want to have some candy while walking the neighborhood, have some on hand so that you can give them treats you know are safe. Also, if one child has an allergy and another does not, be sure to include the entire family in the conversation around allergies and rules. Instead of phrasing the rules as restrictive, set it up so it feels special. Such as “we get to dive into our candy bowls together as a family after trick-or-treating.” Or, “to be safe we will save all of our candy for when we get home and then you can have 5 pieces before bedtime.” When boundaries are set, especially with a reward such as x amount of candy after trick-or-treating, kids feel prepared and know what will happen which helps to reduce their anxiety and in turn, yours as the parent.

Provide Non-Food Fun: While Halloween is certainly a candy focused holiday, there are other non-food ways to make it fun. Have a few non-food items to pop into your child’s bucket if all of the candy options pose a threat to their allergy. Glow sticks are always a winner, cracking the tube and watching it light up and light the way as you walk. Other ideas include stickers, spider rings, monster stamps, vampire teeth and bookmarks.

Allergy Friendly Candy:

Dum-Dums

Skittles

Swedish Fish

Starbursts

Smarties

Lifesavers

Always read the label before giving a treat to your child. If you are uncertain about an ingredient in a candy, please do not give it to your child. Select an allergy friendly option or non-food treats.

Introducing Pharmacist Sam!

Improved Patient Outcomes with Dietitian and Pharmacist Collaboration

We are thrilled to be collaborating and working with Pharmacist extraordinaire Samantha!

It’s National Pharmacy Week!

Let’s celebrate our pharmacy friends and discuss how collaboration with them has the potential to improve patient outcomes.

Today our focus is diabetes education. There are numerous diabetes medications available to help manage insulin resistance. Some of these medications come with some not so wanted adverse effects – nausea, headache, urinary tract infections, etc. Other medications do have “desirable” side effects such as weight loss and appetite suppression, and several more medications have a mix of unwanted and wanted adverse effects. This makes medication choice and adherence quite difficult. While we agree that medication selection is between you and your physician, we can help make the most of your prescribed medication(s).

What if you could improve your outcomes with some help from a dietitian AND pharmacist?

A recent pilot study in Japan observed the link between pharmacist-dietitian collaborative support and patients’ Type 2 diabetes management outcomes. (A few things to note – this was a very small (pilot) study with only 8 participants, results were collected after 6 months, and two of the measured scores were subjective.) In this study, the dietitian provided nutrition and lifestyle modification counseling while the pharmacist counseled on the prescribed medications. The results showed a significant reduction in A1C and a significant increase in HDL. While more research on pharmacist-dietitian collaboration is needed, we believe more improved patient outcomes will be seen with this teamwork.

Until this collaboration is researched more and implemented in our healthcare sites there are some steps you can take to reach your health goals. 

  1. Be your own health advocate!
  2. Ask questions! Curious about your medications?  Pharmacists are there to help you understand everything about your prescribed medications. 
  3. Ready to take steps to further improve your health? Dietitians love to discuss nutrition and provide personalized nutrition counseling.
  4. Embrace the process! Change isn’t easy but small lifestyle changes produce big results!

Thrive Nutrition RDN’s Tips:

  1. Diabetes can be complicated and overwhelming, find a dietitian to help you!
  2. Keep a food diary and journal your meals and fluids.
  3. Know your numbers, start tracking your blood sugar and look for patterns.
  4. Small lifestyle changes can equal big results! Ask your dietitian for recommendations

Pharmacist Sam’s Tips:

  1. Be consistent with your medications. Forget a dose? Call your pharmacist to know what to do!
  2. Fill all your prescriptions at the same pharmacy so your pharmacist can monitor for drug interactions.
  3. Some medication adverse effects resolve over time. 
  4. Do not stop taking your medication without consulting your doctor or pharmacist.

Reference:

A pilot study of Pharmacist-Dietician Collaborative support and Advice (PDCA) for patients with type 2 diabetes in community pharmacy: A single-arm, pre-post study

PMID: 35919801

Blueberry Dutch Baby

Blueberry Dutch Baby

Blueberry Dutch Baby
Blueberry Dutch Baby
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Blueberry Dutch Baby

Blueberry Dutch Baby


  • Author: Amy RD, LDN
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Yield: 6 Servings 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 3 Eggs
  • 1/3 cup Sugar
  • 1/2 tsp Lemon Zest
  • Pinch Salt
  • 2/3 cup Almond Milk
  • 1/3 cup All Purpose Flour
  • 1/3 cup Oat, Almond or Wheat Flour (may also sub more AP Flour)
  • 3 tbsp Butter
  • 1 1/2 cups Blueberries (can use fresh or frozen)

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 425° F
  2. Heat a 9-inch cast iron pan over medium low heat. Add the butter and melt.
  3. In a medium sized bowl, whisk the eggs so they are nicely mixed together.
  4. Add the sugar, lemon zest and salt. Whisk until mixture becomes slightly foamy on top.
  5. To the bowl, whisk in the almond milk.
  6. Next whisk in the flours until just combined
     
  7. Pour the mixture into your pan with melted butter.
  8. Add the blueberries to the top of the mixture, spreading them evenly.
  9. Bake at 425° F for 18-22 minutes until nicely golden brown.
  10. Sprinkle powdered sugar over top, slice and enjoy!
 
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Category: Breakfast, Dessert
  • Method: Bake

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 202
  • Sugar: 15g
  • Sodium: 105mg
  • Fat: 9g
  • Carbohydrates: 26g
  • Fiber: 2g
  • Protein: 5g
  • Cholesterol: 108mg

Keywords: Dutch Baby, Blueberry, Breakfast

Recipe Card powered byTasty Recipes

Benefits of Plant Based Diets for Psoriasis

I received such great feedback from my collaboration with Vegnews on a the benefits of a plant-based diet for psoriasis I thought I would expand on this topic.

What is Psoriasis?

First off, what exactly is Psoriasis? Psoriasis is an immune mediated disease, meaning that the exact cause of this disease is unclear. What we do know is that it causes inflammation in the body which is generally characterized by raised plaques and/or scaly skin. The National Psoriasis Foundation estimates that psoriasis affects 3% of the adult U.S. population.

Current Treatments

Treatments for psoriasis can vary and include everything from pharmacology steroids, to light therapy to alternative treatments such as aloe Vera and fish oil supplements. The chronic inflammation of this disease is characterized by psoriatic lesions, resulting in oxidative stress. For those suffering with psoriasis the unpredictability of the disease can induce even more stress, triggering more psoriasis flare-ups.

While the internet is full of lots of helpful health information, regarding psoriasis, a 2019 research report estimated that nearly two-thirds of YouTube videos on psoriasis disseminate misleading or even dangerous content. Always consult your doctor or medical professional before making health changes. Registered dietitians are credentialed and licensed by state to provide you with expert nutrition recommendations.

Plant-Based Diet Effect on Psoriasis

Now, back to psoriasis inflammation and how plants can help! As with all nutrition recommendations I go to the research. At the foundational level, a diet for inflammation should be anti-inflammatory focused. This is where a plant-based diet comes in.

Plant foods are rich in antioxidants and phytochemicals. Antioxidants are substances that protect against harmful effects of free radicals. Phytochemicals, also referred to as phytonutrients are chemicals found in plants, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, beans, nuts, herbs and spices that have the potential to stimulate the immune system, reduce inflammation and reduce oxidative damage to cells. Research shows that a diet rich in vitamin C, Beta-carotene and flavanoids helps to improve psoriatic skin lesions. Keep in mind many of these antioxidant nutrients are found in skincare products and oral supplements, however the best way to get the benefits of these nutrients is through food sources.

Key Nutrients for anti-inflammatory benefits:

Vitamin C: Vitamin C is an antioxidant and helps with collagen formation, a key structural component of our skin.

Sources: Broccoli, kiwi, strawberries, bell peppers, tomatoes

Vitamin E: This antioxidant is found in our skin oil and helps create a natural barrier to keep moisture in our skin and helps reduce skin’s inflammatory response.

Sources: Nuts, seeds, avocado, legumes

Omega-3: These polyunsaturated fatty acids have been suspected to have anti-psoriatic effects.

Sources: Walnuts, flaxseed, salmon, mackerel

Flavanoids: These plant compounds have been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects in the body.

Sources: Berries, onions, kale, cabbage, tea, parsley, citrus fruits

Dietary Fiber and short-chain fatty acids: Short-chain-fatty-acids are the by-products of fiber fermentation in the colon. They help to regulate inflammation in the intestines and have been shown to improve psoriasis.

Sources: Most SCFAS are made in the gut when following a plant-based diet. Sources include high fiber fruits and vegetables: garlic, onions, peas, lentils, bananas, apples, carrots. The list goes on!

Foods to Avoid:

Studies have shown that certain foods can promote the inflammatory response in the body and worsen skin disorders, such as psoriasis. Foods that promote inflammation include saturated fats such as those in red meat. Of course, if you are eating a plant-based diet red meat is not of concern. However, simple sugars have been shown to exacerbate psoriasis. So, avoiding excessive intake of simple sugars and simple carbohydrates is recommended.

Research shows that alcohol and smoking can exacerbate the symptoms of psoriasis and should be avoided when possible to reduce symptoms. Psychological stress is also a risk factor for psoriasis and dealing with psoriasis also causes stress, so this is a cycle that makes dealing with psoriasis very difficult.

Thrive RDN Final Thoughts:

Replacing processed foods, simple carbohydrates and simple sugars with vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, and legumes will help support healthy skin and help to ease the inflammation associated with psoriasis. A diet that is rich in antioxidants and plant-focused can help in providing relief to those dealing with psoriasis.

Interested in seeing how a plant-focused diet can help with your psoriasis? Contact Amy or schedule a free 15-minute consultation today.

References:

Garbicz, J., Całyniuk, B., Górski, M., Buczkowska, M., Piecuch, M., Kulik, A., & Rozentryt, P. (2021). Nutritional Therapy in Persons Suffering from Psoriasis. Nutrients, 14(1), 119. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010119

Kanda, N., Hoashi, T., & Saeki, H. (2020). Nutrition and Psoriasis. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 21(15), 5405. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21155405

Musumeci, M. L., Nasca, M. R., Boscaglia, S., & Micali, G. (2022). The role of lifestyle and nutrition in psoriasis: Current status of knowledge and interventions. Dermatologic Therapy, 35(9), e15685. https://doi.org/10.1111/dth.15685

Phytochemicals’ Role in Good Health. (n.d.). Retrieved September 14, 2022, from https://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/090313p70.shtml

Staff, E. (2020, September 21). Food for Healthy Skin. Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter. https://www.nutritionletter.tufts.edu/healthy-eating/food-for-healthy-skin/